South Junction

Construction overview of the south junction taken June 2012

There were several challenges constructing the south junction.

Contractors had to contend with a highly constrained space between the tunnel entrances and the Metro bridge, with housing to the west of the junction.

Poor ground conditions meant that polystyrene blocks had to be installed to provide a stable foundation for the road.

In addition, poor ground conditions meant that polystyrene blocks had to be installed to provide a stable foundation for the road.

Howard Street Bridge was demolished and replaced

The new interchange connecting the A19 and the local road network was built south of Howard Street bridge, which was demolished and replaced. From the southern portal, highway works extended a further 400 metres south connecting with the A19 just south of the Metro bridge.

A roundabout near the southern entrance to the original tunnel was removed and the A19 become a through route. The new ramp near Epinay Walk enables full access to and from the local road network.

Construction of the south approach also had to overcome supporting the 38,000 daily vehicle movements in and out of the existing Tyne Tunnel, whilst demolishing existing infrastructure and building new structures. This involved detailed planning and coordination, and necessitated some out-of-hours works in order to avoid peak traffic flows.
 

A bridge carrying Howard Street in Jarrow was demolished and Howard Street realigned.

Courtesy of Thompsons of Prudhoe

In addition, the construction of a new access road from Howard Street bridge, passing in front of Epinay Walk, required sensitive management in order to minimise disruption to residents living nearby.

Furthermore, a combined sewer had to be diverted in order to enable the new junction to be constructed. The diverted sewer ran across the removed roundabout and had to be constructed whilst maintaining traffic movements at this busy junction.