On the south bank

The cut and cover section of the tunnel involved both diaphragm wall methods and secant piling.
At their deepest the excavation extended 30 metres down.

The majority of this section involved cut-and-cover techniques similar to that undertaken on the north bank. However, two short sections of the tunnel were constructed by underground boring.

The cut-and-cover section of the tunnel involved both diaphragm wall methods and secant piling. At their deepest, the excavation extended 30 metres down. The majority of the tunnel section is made up of diaphragm walls, constructed either side of the tunnel route.

Where the tunnel was bored, a technique called Sprayed Concrete lining was used.

Once these diaphragm walls were built, the space between them was excavated and the tunnel constructed in situ. For the section of tunnel that used secant piling, the technique was similar to that of the diaphragm wall sections. Interlocking piles were used to create the supported space for excavation rather than reinforced underground walls.

Where the tunnel was bored, a technique called "Sprayed Concrete Lining" was used. This involved boring out the material from below ground and spraying the space with concrete as the excavation proceeds, in order to support the excavated space. This is a safe and well-established technique enabling utilities and certain roads to remain undisturbed by construction activity. The sprayed concrete lining sections comprise of an outer sprayed concrete primary lining and an inner cast in situ permanent lining.
 

In addition, an in-situ reinforced concrete box structure was constructed, which formed the final southern end of the tunnel, extending out to the south junction from underneath the specially constructed Howard Street road bridge.

The south bank section extended from the southern tunnel portal in Jarrow to the riverside transition structure on the southern bank of the Tyne, a distance of approximately 840m. A special transition structure was constructed at the river bank which allowed the immersed tube to be sealed against the cut and cover tunnel.

One of the challenges faced during construction on the South approach has been the protection or diversion of numerous utility services. Electric, gas, telecommunications, water and sewerage connections passed through the construction corridor and all had to be protected or diverted during construction.

The tunnel portals were extended south to reduce noise and improve air quality for local people. The sun visor at the Jarrow entrance of the original tunnel, which enabled motorists to adjust to different lighting levels, was demolished and replaced with artificial lighting.

A landscaped linear park was created about the line of the new – tunnel.

A new roundabout was built at the junction of Ferry Street, Chaytor Street, and the road leading to the Tyne Pedestrian and Cyclist Tunnels.

The ventilation chimney and related infrastructure near Chaytor Street in Jarrow was modified. A new ventilation shaft was built within the new Jarrow Interchange to serve the new tunnel.

The roundabout near the southern entrance to the existing tunnel was removed. A new interchange connecting the A19 and the local road network via slip roads was also built south of Howard Street bridge.

A landscaped linear park was created above the line of the new tunnel.